Authoritarian and benevolent god representations and the two sides of prosociality

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Big Gods model focuses on belief in an authoritarian God as a psychological mechanism that inhibits antisocial behavior and facilitates the formation of tight cohesive groups. Recent empirical evidence suggests however that belief in a benevolent God is more likely to inspire helping and inclusivity. Both kinds of beliefs are necessary to explain the development of large-scale societies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e16
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume39
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

god
Psychology
society
evidence
Deity
God Representation
Group
Inclusivity
Psychological
Empirical Evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

@article{e6314b342c394f7ab2846bc82b3a7692,
title = "Authoritarian and benevolent god representations and the two sides of prosociality",
abstract = "The Big Gods model focuses on belief in an authoritarian God as a psychological mechanism that inhibits antisocial behavior and facilitates the formation of tight cohesive groups. Recent empirical evidence suggests however that belief in a benevolent God is more likely to inspire helping and inclusivity. Both kinds of beliefs are necessary to explain the development of large-scale societies.",
author = "Kathryn Johnson and Adam Cohen",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1017/S0140525X15000461",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "e16",
journal = "Behavioral and Brain Sciences",
issn = "0140-525X",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Authoritarian and benevolent god representations and the two sides of prosociality

AU - Johnson, Kathryn

AU - Cohen, Adam

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The Big Gods model focuses on belief in an authoritarian God as a psychological mechanism that inhibits antisocial behavior and facilitates the formation of tight cohesive groups. Recent empirical evidence suggests however that belief in a benevolent God is more likely to inspire helping and inclusivity. Both kinds of beliefs are necessary to explain the development of large-scale societies.

AB - The Big Gods model focuses on belief in an authoritarian God as a psychological mechanism that inhibits antisocial behavior and facilitates the formation of tight cohesive groups. Recent empirical evidence suggests however that belief in a benevolent God is more likely to inspire helping and inclusivity. Both kinds of beliefs are necessary to explain the development of large-scale societies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84969601857&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84969601857&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0140525X15000461

DO - 10.1017/S0140525X15000461

M3 - Article

C2 - 26948733

AN - SCOPUS:84969601857

VL - 39

SP - e16

JO - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

JF - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

SN - 0140-525X

ER -