Australian Students with Disabilities Accessing NAPLAN: Lessons from a decade of inclusive assessment in the United States

Stephen Elliott, Michael Davies, Ryan J. Kettler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Australian legislation and educational policies may espouse, but not yet fully enact, inclusive assessments for all. In relation to the National Assessment Program for Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN), for example, almost 5% of students are either exempt or withdrawn. The achievement levels of these students, many of whom have disabilities, are not being accurately benchmarked. In contrast, the United States, for more than a decade, has been developing and applying a range of strategies in an effort to provide assessment for all students. Lessons from these experiences are summarised, and three key strategies are provided, to assist the Australian Curriculum, Assessment, and Reporting Authority (ACARA) and associated testing authorities in promoting the development and implementation of a more effective and inclusive assessment regime for all Australian students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-19
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Disability, Development and Education
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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disability
literacy
Students
Education
student
Legislation
Curriculum
educational policy
legislation
regime
curriculum
experience

Keywords

  • accessible tests
  • inclusive assessment
  • item modifications
  • opportunity to learn
  • students with disabilities
  • testing accommodations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education
  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

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