Auditory training in patients with unilateral cochlear implant and contralateral acoustic stimulation

Ting Zhang, Michael Dorman, Qian Jie Fu, Anthony J. Spahr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: It was hypothesized that auditory training would allow bimodal patients to combine in a better manner the low-frequency acoustic information provided by a hearing aid with the electric information provided by a cochlear implant, thus maximizing the benefit of combining acoustic (A) and electric (E) stimulation (EAS). Design: Performance in quiet or in the presence of a multitalker babble at +5 dB signal to noise ratio was evaluated in seven bimodal patients before and after auditory training. The performance measures comprised identification of vowels and consonants, consonant-nucleus-consonant words, sentences, voice gender, and emotion. Baseline performance was evaluated in the A-alone, E-alone, and combined EAS conditions once per week for 3 weeks. A phonetic-contrast training protocol was used to facilitate speech perceptual learning. Patients trained at home 1 hour a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks with both their cochlear implant and hearing aid devices on. Performance was remeasured after the 4 weeks of training and 1 month after training stopped. Results: After training, there was significant improvement in vowel, consonant, and consonant-nucleus-consonant word identification in the E and EAS conditions. The magnitude of improvement in the E condition was equivalent to that in the EAS condition. The improved performance was largely retained 1 month after training stopped. Conclusion: Auditory training, in the form administered in this study, can improve bimodal patients' overall speech understanding by improving E-alone performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEar and Hearing
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

Fingerprint

Acoustic Stimulation
Cochlear Implants
Hearing Aids
Acoustics
Phonetics
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Electric Stimulation
Emotions
Learning
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Auditory training in patients with unilateral cochlear implant and contralateral acoustic stimulation. / Zhang, Ting; Dorman, Michael; Fu, Qian Jie; Spahr, Anthony J.

In: Ear and Hearing, Vol. 33, No. 6, 11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Ting ; Dorman, Michael ; Fu, Qian Jie ; Spahr, Anthony J. / Auditory training in patients with unilateral cochlear implant and contralateral acoustic stimulation. In: Ear and Hearing. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 6.
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