Attributions of HIV onset controllability, emotional reactions, and helping intentions: Implicit effects of victim sexual orientation

Jason D. Seacat, Richard Hirschman, Kristin D. Mickelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

A vignette methodology was used to investigate the effects of systematically manipulating HIV onset controllability and victim sexual orientation on (a) participant attributions about a victim (i.e., perceptions of victim control, responsibility, and blame); (b) participant emotional reactions (anger and sympathy) toward a victim; and (c) participant helping intentions toward a victim. Weiner's (1980a, 1980b, 1995) attributional helping model was tested to determine whether participant anger and sympathy mediated the onset controllability/helping intentions relationship. A total of 399 undergraduate psychology students completed the survey. Statistically significant effects were found for HIV onset controllability and victim sexual orientation on participant attributions, emotional reactions, and helping intentions. Theoretical and practical implications of the study are addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1442-1461
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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