Attachment and loss experiences during childhood are associated with adult hostility, depression, and social support

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: This study examined developmental antecedents to psychosocial traits in adulthood that have been linked in prior studies to increased risk of heart disease. The hypothesis was tested that early parental loss coupled with poor-quality family relationships (FR) during childhood would be associated with increased hostility and depression, and lower social support in adulthood. Methods: Participants included 30 university students who experienced the death of one parent before the age of 16, and 31 control participants. Questionnaires were completed measuring current social support, hostility, depression, and the quality of FR. Results: Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) supported the hypothesis of maladaptive psychosocial characteristics in loss participants reporting poorer-quality FR. Significant interactions of loss and FR were found for individual variables of depressive symptoms, social support, and hostility. Conclusion: These results provide evidence that parental loss in childhood is associated with health-damaging psychosocial characteristics in adulthood only if the quality of the surviving FR is poor. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-91
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2000

Keywords

  • Attachment
  • Depression
  • Development
  • Hostility
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Attachment and loss experiences during childhood are associated with adult hostility, depression, and social support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this