Atmospheric correction and surface spectral unit mapping using thermal emission imaging system data

Joshua L. Bandfield, Deanne Rogers, Michael D. Smith, Philip Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three techniques are described for the extraction of surface emissivity and compositional information from Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) images. Synthetic images were constructed with different atmospheric properties and random and systematic errors to estimate the uncertainty in the retrieved surface emissivity. The three techniques are as follows: (1) A constant radiance removal algorithm determines and removes a constant radiance from atmospheric emission as well as systematic calibration radiance offsets. (2) Surface emissivity retrieval uses low-resolution Thermal Emission Spectrometer surface emissivity data to determine atmospheric properties for an image that can be then applied to individual THEMIS pixels. (3) A spectral unit mapping algorithm determines spectral end-member concentrations using a deconvolution routine similar to several previous applications. The initial application of these techniques to three images covering the same region of the Martian surface but at different surface temperature and atmospheric conditions yields consistent surface spectral shapes as well as end-member concentrations. Retrieved aerosol opacity information is consistent with an independently developed opacity retrieval method. The application of the techniques described here is done in a stepwise fashion and may be applied to the desired level of analysis necessary for interpretation of surface properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research E: Planets
Volume109
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 25 2004

Fingerprint

atmospheric correction
data systems
thermal emission
Imaging systems
emissivity
radiance
opacity
Opacity
retrieval
airglow
random errors
meteorology
Random errors
Systematic errors
systematic errors
surface properties
Deconvolution
surface temperature
deconvolution
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Atmospheric correction
  • Infrared spectroscopy
  • Mars

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oceanography
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Atmospheric correction and surface spectral unit mapping using thermal emission imaging system data. / Bandfield, Joshua L.; Rogers, Deanne; Smith, Michael D.; Christensen, Philip.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, Vol. 109, No. 10, 25.10.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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