Associative conditioning can increase liking for and consumption of brussels sprouts in children aged 3 to 5 years

Elizabeth D. Capaldi-Phillips, Devina Wadhera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pairing foods with liked flavors repeatedly can increase preferences for those foods. Wecompared the effectiveness of associative conditioning (pairing vegetables with sweetened and unsweetened cream cheese) and exposure (presenting vegetables alone) in increasing liking and consumption of bitter and nonbitter vegetables. Twenty-nine children (aged 3 to 5 years) participated in the study. One group of children received brussels sprouts (bitter) with sweetened cream cheese and cauliflower (nonbitter) with unsweetened cream cheese and a second group received the reverse pairing. A third group received brussels sprouts and cauliflower with no cream cheese. Pairing brussels sprouts with cream cheese increased liking and consumption more than exposure, whereas cauliflower was liked by all groups regardless of presence of cream cheese. Associative conditioning was more effective than exposure in increasing liking for a novel, bitter vegetable-brussels sprouts-whereas exposure alone was effective for a nonbitter, more familiar vegetable-cauliflower.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1236-1241
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume114
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • Associative conditioning
  • Bitter
  • Exposure
  • Nonbitter
  • Vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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