Associations between Fine Motor Performance in Activities of Daily Living and Cognitive Ability in a Nondemented Sample of Older Adults: Implications for Geriatric Physical Rehabilitation

Elizabeth B. Fauth, Sydney Y. Schaefer, Steven H. Zarit, Marie Ernsth-Bravell, Boo Johansson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Fine motor ability (FMA) is essential in certain activities of daily living (ADL) and is considered mostly as a component of physical function. We hypothesize that cognitive ability explains significant variance in ADL-related FMA, above and beyond what is explained by physical ability (grip strength). Method: Origins of Variance in the Old Old Study (OCTO)-Twin participants (n = 218), aged 80+ (dementia, stroke, Parkinson's disease excluded) were assessed on depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale [CES-D]), a cognitive battery, grip strength, and FMA. Results: In a series of ordinary least squares regression models, FMA was not associated with gender or depressive symptoms, but was associated with age (marginally; β = '.164, p =.051), grip strength (β = '.381, p <.01), and one cognitive measure, perceptual speed (β = '.249, p <.01). Discussion: In nondemented older adults, cognitive speed predicts ADL-related FMA after controlling for age and physical ability. Physical rehabilitation of FMA in ADL tasks should consider the importance of cognitive ability, even in nondemented older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1144-1159
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Keywords

  • cognitive ability
  • disablement
  • fine motor ability
  • functional ability
  • grip strength

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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