Association of sleep duration with kidney function and albuminuria

NHANES 2009-2012

Megan Petrov, Matthew Buman, Mark L. Unruh, Carol M. Baldwin, Mihyun Jeong, Luxana Reynaga-Ornelas, Shawn Youngstedt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and markers of kidney function. Design: A cross-sectional survey from the 2009-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Setting and Participants: The participants were 8690 adults (≥. 20 years) without a previous sleep disorder diagnosis, end-stage kidney failure, or other kidney or liver problems. Subsamples with pre-diabetes and pre-hypertension were examined. Measurements: Participants reported habitual sleep duration, coded as ≤. 5, 6, 7, 8, and ≥. 9 hours per night. Biomarkers of kidney function were determined, including glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) estimated from the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation, urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), microalbuminuria status, and glomerular hyperfiltration status. Weighted and adjusted general linear models assessed associations between sleep duration with eGFR and ACR. Logistic regression analyses evaluated the associations of microalbuminuria and glomerular hyperfiltration status with sleep duration. Results: Greater eGFR was related to short sleep duration in the total sample and among participants with pre-diabetes. Greater ACR was associated with short and long sleep duration. Short sleep duration (≤. 5 hours) was associated with an increased odds for glomerular hyperfiltration (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 0.97-2.06) and microalbuminuria (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.96-1.79). Conclusions: In a US representative sample of adults, self-reported short and long sleep duration were related to higher ACR. Short sleep duration was associated with higher eGFR and microalbuminuria. Research is needed to understand whether these associations indicate increased risk for kidney damage and cardiovascular risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-81
Number of pages7
JournalSleep Health
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Albuminuria
Nutrition Surveys
Sleep
Kidney
Albumins
Creatinine
Prehypertension
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Renal Insufficiency
Linear Models
Epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Biomarkers
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Urine
Liver

Keywords

  • Albuminuria
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Glomerular filtration rate
  • National survey
  • Renal function
  • Sleep duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Association of sleep duration with kidney function and albuminuria : NHANES 2009-2012. / Petrov, Megan; Buman, Matthew; Unruh, Mark L.; Baldwin, Carol M.; Jeong, Mihyun; Reynaga-Ornelas, Luxana; Youngstedt, Shawn.

In: Sleep Health, Vol. 2, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 75-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Petrov, Megan ; Buman, Matthew ; Unruh, Mark L. ; Baldwin, Carol M. ; Jeong, Mihyun ; Reynaga-Ornelas, Luxana ; Youngstedt, Shawn. / Association of sleep duration with kidney function and albuminuria : NHANES 2009-2012. In: Sleep Health. 2016 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 75-81.
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