Association of childhood economic hardship with adult height and adult adiposity among hispanics/latinos. The HCHS/SOL socio-cultural ancillary study

Carmen R. Isasi, Molly Jung, Christina M. Parrinello, Robert C. Kaplan, Ryung Kim, Noe C. Crespo, Patricia Gonzalez, Natalia A. Gouskova, Frank J. Penedo, Krista M. Perreira, Tatiana Perrino, Daniela Sotres-Alvarez, Linda Van Horn, Linda C. Gallo

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    The study examined the association of childhood and current economic hardship with anthropometric indices in Hispanic/Latino adults, using data from the HCHS/SOL Socio-cultural ancillary study (N = 5,084), a community-based study of Hispanic/Latinos living in four urban areas (Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA). Childhood economic hardship was defined as having experienced a period of time when one's family had trouble paying for basic needs (e.g., food, housing), and when this economic hardship occurred: between 0-12, 13-18 years old, or throughout both of those times. Current economic hardship was defined as experiencing trouble paying for basic needs during the past 12 months. Anthropometry included height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and percentage body fat (%BF). Complex survey linear regression models were used to test the associations of childhood economic hardship with adult anthropometric indices, adjusting for potential confounders (e.g., age, sex, Hispanic background). Childhood economic hardship varied by Hispanic background, place of birth, and adult socio-economic status. Childhood economic hardship during both periods, childhood and adolescence, was associated with shorter height. Childhood economic hardship was associated with greater adiposity among US born individuals only. Current economic hardship was significantly associated with all three measures of adiposity (BMI, WC, %BF). These findings suggest that previous periods of childhood economic hardship appear to influence adult height more than adiposity, whereas current economic hardship may be a better determinant of adult adiposity in Hispanics.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numbere0149923
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume11
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

    Fingerprint

    Adiposity
    adiposity
    Hispanic Americans
    childhood
    Economics
    economics
    waist circumference
    Waist Circumference
    body mass index
    Linear Models
    Body Mass Index
    Anthropometry
    socioeconomic status
    anthropometric measurements
    urban areas
    body fat
    Linear regression
    Adipose Tissue
    Fats

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Association of childhood economic hardship with adult height and adult adiposity among hispanics/latinos. The HCHS/SOL socio-cultural ancillary study. / Isasi, Carmen R.; Jung, Molly; Parrinello, Christina M.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kim, Ryung; Crespo, Noe C.; Gonzalez, Patricia; Gouskova, Natalia A.; Penedo, Frank J.; Perreira, Krista M.; Perrino, Tatiana; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Van Horn, Linda; Gallo, Linda C.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 2, e0149923, 01.02.2016.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Isasi, CR, Jung, M, Parrinello, CM, Kaplan, RC, Kim, R, Crespo, NC, Gonzalez, P, Gouskova, NA, Penedo, FJ, Perreira, KM, Perrino, T, Sotres-Alvarez, D, Van Horn, L & Gallo, LC 2016, 'Association of childhood economic hardship with adult height and adult adiposity among hispanics/latinos. The HCHS/SOL socio-cultural ancillary study', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 2, e0149923. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0149923
    Isasi, Carmen R. ; Jung, Molly ; Parrinello, Christina M. ; Kaplan, Robert C. ; Kim, Ryung ; Crespo, Noe C. ; Gonzalez, Patricia ; Gouskova, Natalia A. ; Penedo, Frank J. ; Perreira, Krista M. ; Perrino, Tatiana ; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela ; Van Horn, Linda ; Gallo, Linda C. / Association of childhood economic hardship with adult height and adult adiposity among hispanics/latinos. The HCHS/SOL socio-cultural ancillary study. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 2.
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    AU - Perreira, Krista M.

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