Assessment of human exposure to triclocarban, triclosan and five parabens in U.S. indoor dust using dispersive solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

Jing Chen, Erica M. Hartmann, Jeff Kline, Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg, Rolf U. Halden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antimicrobials in indoor dust pose concerns due to their endocrine disrupting activities and potential promotion of antibiotic resistance. We adopted dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to quantify antimicrobials in dust. The method showed favorable linearity (R2 >0.99), recovery (83–115%), and method detection limits (1.2–5.6 ng/g, dry weight). All seven analytes were found at median concentrations in ng/g in each of the 80 U.S. dust samples collected from athletic facilities and residential homes: methyl paraben (1920) > propyl paraben (965) > triclosan (390) > triclocarban (270) > ethyl paraben (195) > butyl paraben (80) > benzyl paraben (6). Triclosan levels in dust from athletic facilities were significantly higher than those in private homes (p < 0.05). Median estimated daily intake (EDI) of antimicrobials in ng/kg-body weight/d from dust ingestion was lowest for adults (1.9) and higher for more sensitive subpopulations, including infants (19.8), toddlers (23.6), children (11.8) and teenagers (4.6). This first application of d-SPE to the analysis of dust produced U.S. baseline data for triclosan and triclocarban levels in indoor dust just prior to the 2017 Federal ban on use of these trichlorinated aromatics in antiseptic soaps and related personal care products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-630
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume360
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2018

Fingerprint

Parabens
Triclosan
Solid Phase Extraction
Liquid chromatography
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Dust
Liquid Chromatography
Mass spectrometry
liquid chromatography
mass spectrometry
dust
Gymnasiums
Sports
Propylparaben
Residential Facilities
Soaps
Local Anti-Infective Agents
Soaps (detergents)
antibiotic resistance
Antibiotics

Keywords

  • Dust
  • Paraben
  • QuEChERS
  • Triclocarban
  • Triclosan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Assessment of human exposure to triclocarban, triclosan and five parabens in U.S. indoor dust using dispersive solid phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. / Chen, Jing; Hartmann, Erica M.; Kline, Jeff; Van Den Wymelenberg, Kevin; Halden, Rolf U.

In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 360, 15.10.2018, p. 623-630.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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