Assessing or predicting adoption of telehealth using the diffusion of innovations theory

A practical example from a rural program in New Mexico

Deborah Helitzer, Debra Heath, Kristine Maltrud, Eileen Sullivan, Dale Alverson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In New Mexico, a large rural state, it was anticipated that telehealth would bring significant value to health care delivery, improve local capacity for patient care, decrease the need for patient travel, diminish professional isolation, provide an avenue for enhanced professional education and information sharing, increase access to care, and ultimately improve health status. During the course of an evaluation of the University of New Mexico Center for Telehealth's rural telemedicine program, we used a grounded theory approach to assess barriers to the adoption of telemedicine and components of successful adoption. We then turned to the diffusion of innovations theory to better understand the dynamic interactions between the characteristics of telehealth and the social system in which it is applied. In doing so, we learned that the type of innovation decision involved in the adoption of telehealth appears to be particularly important in determining adoption. In this article we demonstrate that diffusion theory can be a useful framework for evaluating telehealth programs. We also suggest that the development of a predictive tool for prospective assessment would be useful, and could be applied when new telehealth programs are being planned.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-187
Number of pages9
JournalTelemedicine Journal and e-Health
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Diffusion of Innovation
Telemedicine
Professional Education
Information Dissemination
Health Status
Patient Care
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

Cite this

Assessing or predicting adoption of telehealth using the diffusion of innovations theory : A practical example from a rural program in New Mexico. / Helitzer, Deborah; Heath, Debra; Maltrud, Kristine; Sullivan, Eileen; Alverson, Dale.

In: Telemedicine Journal and e-Health, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.01.2003, p. 179-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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