Assessing measurement invariance for spanish sentence repetition and morphology elicitation tasks

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate evidence supporting the construct validity of two grammatical tasks (sentence repetition, morphology elicitation) included in the Spanish Screener for Language Impairment in Children (Restrepo, Gorin, & Gray, 2013). We evaluated if the tasks measured the targeted grammatical skills in the same way across predominantly Spanish-speaking children with typical language development and those with primary language impairment. Method: A multiple-group, confirmatory factor analytic approach was applied to examine factorial invariance in a sample of 307 predominantly Spanish-speaking children (177 with typical language development; 130 with primary language impairment). The 2 newly developed grammatical tasks were modeled as measures in a unidimensional confirmatory factor analytic model along with 3 wellestablished grammatical measures from the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals–Fourth Edition, Spanish (Wiig, Semel, & Secord, 2006). Results: Results suggest that both new tasks measured the construct of grammatical skills for both language-ability groups in an equivalent manner. Conclusions: There was no evidence of bias related to children’s language status for the Spanish Screener for Language Impairment in Children Sentence Repetition or Morphology Elicitation tasks. Results provide support for the validity of the new tasks as measures of grammatical skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-266
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

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