Assessing LEED versus Non-LEED energy consumption for a university campus in North America: A preliminary study

Claire Tilton, Mounir El Asmar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Today, buildings contribute about 40% of the world's carbon dioxide emissions and consume about 70% of the electricity produced in the United States. Due to this high rate of consumption, governments and numerous organizations have worked avidly on ways to design, build, and recognize high-performance or sustainable buildings. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system is intended to award buildings that "save energy, use fewer resources and reduce pollution." This paper is part of a study that aims to test the following hypothesis: LEED certified buildings save energy in their operations phase. The research objective was accomplished by investigating LEED-certified buildings on a university campus and measuring their energy performance against that of non-LEED building counterparts. Energy performance was calculated in terms of energy unit intensity (EUI) by combining heating, cooling, and electricity data from the metered buildings on campus. Preliminary data show LEED-certified dormitory buildings seem to have lower energy consumption as compared to non-LEED buildings, LEED-certified research buildings seem to use more energy than their non-LEED counterparts, and LEED office buildings are not displaying major differences in energy performance. However, the use and research intensity of these buildings and their effect on energy consumption have not been investigated yet, and statistical analysis is currently being completed to verify these preliminary conclusions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationICSI 2014: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages1071-1076
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9780784478745
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Event2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World, ICSI 2014 - Long Beach, United States
Duration: Nov 6 2014Nov 8 2014

Other

Other2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World, ICSI 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLong Beach
Period11/6/1411/8/14

Fingerprint

Energy utilization
Electricity
Environmental design
Energy consumption
Energy
Office buildings
Statistical methods
Carbon dioxide
Pollution
Cooling
Heating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Tilton, C., & El Asmar, M. (2014). Assessing LEED versus Non-LEED energy consumption for a university campus in North America: A preliminary study. In ICSI 2014: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure (pp. 1071-1076). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784478745.101

Assessing LEED versus Non-LEED energy consumption for a university campus in North America : A preliminary study. / Tilton, Claire; El Asmar, Mounir.

ICSI 2014: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2014. p. 1071-1076.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tilton, C & El Asmar, M 2014, Assessing LEED versus Non-LEED energy consumption for a university campus in North America: A preliminary study. in ICSI 2014: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 1071-1076, 2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World, ICSI 2014, Long Beach, United States, 11/6/14. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784478745.101
Tilton C, El Asmar M. Assessing LEED versus Non-LEED energy consumption for a university campus in North America: A preliminary study. In ICSI 2014: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2014. p. 1071-1076 https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784478745.101
Tilton, Claire ; El Asmar, Mounir. / Assessing LEED versus Non-LEED energy consumption for a university campus in North America : A preliminary study. ICSI 2014: Creating Infrastructure for a Sustainable World - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2014. pp. 1071-1076
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