Assessing comprehension with student-developed construction games

Claire Louise Antaya, Kristen Parrish, Melissa M. Bilec, Amy E. Landis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To train the next generation of construction professionals, we must address teaching approaches so students can have the best opportunity to excel on multidisciplinary teams. Faculty and researchers are piloting an assessment method for an introductory construction class entitled Building Construction Materials, Methods and Equipment. The assessment employs student-developed games to achieve course learning objectives, including mastery of 140 construction-oriented terms, and has the potential to replace the previously assigned photo glossary project in which students summarized how these terms were relevant to real-world construction projects. The team-based game approach, conducted in three stages over three class days, presents an assessment of the games developed in this course via evidence of Bloom's levels of intellectual behavior in game design and accuracy in connecting course concepts to one another [1]. Preliminary results show that students' reaction to learning objective assessment via game-design days is overwhelmingly positive; students have met the game design material and activities with enthusiasm and have already shown excitement in demonstrating mastery of concepts through the team-based, active and experiential learning game design approach. All classroom game development instructions developed during this project will be made available to download and use in classes at other universities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
PublisherAmerican Society for Engineering Education
StatePublished - 2014
Event121st ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: 360 Degrees of Engineering Education - Indianapolis, IN, United States
Duration: Jun 15 2014Jun 18 2014

Other

Other121st ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: 360 Degrees of Engineering Education
CountryUnited States
CityIndianapolis, IN
Period6/15/146/18/14

Fingerprint

Students
Glossaries
Teaching
Problem-Based Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Antaya, C. L., Parrish, K., Bilec, M. M., & Landis, A. E. (2014). Assessing comprehension with student-developed construction games. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings American Society for Engineering Education.

Assessing comprehension with student-developed construction games. / Antaya, Claire Louise; Parrish, Kristen; Bilec, Melissa M.; Landis, Amy E.

ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. American Society for Engineering Education, 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Antaya, CL, Parrish, K, Bilec, MM & Landis, AE 2014, Assessing comprehension with student-developed construction games. in ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. American Society for Engineering Education, 121st ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: 360 Degrees of Engineering Education, Indianapolis, IN, United States, 6/15/14.
Antaya CL, Parrish K, Bilec MM, Landis AE. Assessing comprehension with student-developed construction games. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. American Society for Engineering Education. 2014
Antaya, Claire Louise ; Parrish, Kristen ; Bilec, Melissa M. ; Landis, Amy E. / Assessing comprehension with student-developed construction games. ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings. American Society for Engineering Education, 2014.
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