Aspira: Employing a serious game in an mHealth app to improve asthma outcomes

Jamie Thomson, Chris Hass, Ivor Horn, Elizabeth Kleine, Stephanie Mitchell, Kevin Gary, Ishrat Ahmed, Derek Hamel, Ashish Amresh

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Abstract

This paper presents the design, implementation and evaluation of a home based intervention targeting economically disadvantaged children to improve asthma clinical outcomes. The monitoring and intervention activities were delivered within an embedded astronaut-themed game to promote user acceptance and compliance to the clinical protocol. An iterative, user-centered design process was used to prototype the asthma home monitoring system (Aspira) involving a tablet application, digital spirometer and a particulate monitor linked to a data management server. Children of low socio-economic demographic populations were the main target group for this study as they have significantly high asthma rates and lack of condition awareness. Aspira is the first intervention of its kind that provides the target audience an easy to use and low-cost in-home monitoring application. Aspira's design is grounded in the principles of social cognitive theory and aims to increase use, participation and efficacy in the target population. We present the results of a pilot study to determine feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the resulting high-fidelity Aspira prototype among four families with asthmatic children living in the Seattle metropolitan area.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
ISBN (Electronic)9781509054824
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event5th IEEE International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017 - Perth, Australia
Duration: Apr 2 2017Apr 4 2017

Other

Other5th IEEE International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period4/2/174/4/17

Fingerprint

Application programs
Monitoring
mHealth
Serious games
Telemedicine
Asthma
monitoring
Information management
Servers
Network protocols
Economics
Costs
User centered design
Compliance
Astronauts
Health Services Needs and Demand
Vulnerable Populations
Clinical Protocols
Tablets
Demography

Keywords

  • asthma
  • behavior change
  • home monitor
  • mHealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Media Technology
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education

Cite this

Thomson, J., Hass, C., Horn, I., Kleine, E., Mitchell, S., Gary, K., ... Amresh, A. (2017). Aspira: Employing a serious game in an mHealth app to improve asthma outcomes. In 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017 [7939268] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. DOI: 10.1109/SeGAH.2017.7939268

Aspira : Employing a serious game in an mHealth app to improve asthma outcomes. / Thomson, Jamie; Hass, Chris; Horn, Ivor; Kleine, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Stephanie; Gary, Kevin; Ahmed, Ishrat; Hamel, Derek; Amresh, Ashish.

2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. 7939268.

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Thomson, J, Hass, C, Horn, I, Kleine, E, Mitchell, S, Gary, K, Ahmed, I, Hamel, D & Amresh, A 2017, Aspira: Employing a serious game in an mHealth app to improve asthma outcomes. in 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017., 7939268, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 5th IEEE International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017, Perth, Australia, 4/2/17. DOI: 10.1109/SeGAH.2017.7939268
Thomson J, Hass C, Horn I, Kleine E, Mitchell S, Gary K et al. Aspira: Employing a serious game in an mHealth app to improve asthma outcomes. In 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.2017. 7939268. Available from, DOI: 10.1109/SeGAH.2017.7939268
Thomson, Jamie ; Hass, Chris ; Horn, Ivor ; Kleine, Elizabeth ; Mitchell, Stephanie ; Gary, Kevin ; Ahmed, Ishrat ; Hamel, Derek ; Amresh, Ashish. / Aspira : Employing a serious game in an mHealth app to improve asthma outcomes. 2017 IEEE 5th International Conference on Serious Games and Applications for Health, SeGAH 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017.
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