Asian American cultural socialization and ethnic identity: interdependent self-construal as a mediator

Christina K. Lam, Alisia G.T.T. Tran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study advances the understanding of cultural socialization processes for Asian American emerging adults. We examined whether interdependent self-construal mediated the relation between cultural socialization and ethnic identity exploration and commitment. Method: The current study utilized mediation analyses to explore the associations between cultural socialization (i.e., the process in which individuals learn messages regarding the traditions and values of their culture) via different agents (i.e., parents, teachers, romantic partners, peers); interdependent self-construal (i.e., viewing oneself as connected to others); and ethnic identity exploration and commitment for Asian American college-attending emerging adults (N = 281, 66.5% female, M age = 20.34). Results: Results revealed that interdependent self-construal mediated the association between cultural socialization and ethnic identity exploration and commitment in regards to romantic partners and peers, but not parents and teachers. Conclusions: Results highlight that diverse cultural socialization agents may play a role in ethnic identity formation and suggest that the endorsement of cultural values can be a mechanism through which ethnic identity is strengthened for Asian Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Asian American and Pacific Islanders population
  • mental health or community mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education

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