Arrestees’ Perceptions of the Police

Exploring Procedural Justice, Legitimacy, and Willingness to Cooperate With Police Across Offender Types

Michael White, Philip Mulvey, Lisa M. Dario

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Only a handful of studies have sought to explore the robustness of the relationship between procedural justice, police legitimacy, and willingness to cooperate with police among adults who have recently been arrested. The findings from those studies have raised questions about the durability of the framework for offenders, as well as whether there may be variation in perceptions of police across offender types. The current study explores these issues using data from interviews with a large, criminally diverse sample of recently booked arrestees in Maricopa County, AZ, from 2010 to 2012 (N = 2,262). Findings indicate that procedural justice is strongly associated with views of police legitimacy, and perceptions of police legitimacy do not vary by offender type. Procedural justice and legitimacy perceptions are powerful predictors of willingness to cooperate with the police. Results provide strong support for the extension of the normative, process-based framework to the arrestee population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-364
Number of pages22
JournalCriminal Justice and Behavior
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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willingness to cooperate
Illegitimacy
Social Justice
Police
offender
legitimacy
police
justice
Interviews
interview

Keywords

  • cooperation with police
  • police legitimacy
  • procedural justice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Psychology(all)
  • Law

Cite this

Arrestees’ Perceptions of the Police : Exploring Procedural Justice, Legitimacy, and Willingness to Cooperate With Police Across Offender Types. / White, Michael; Mulvey, Philip; Dario, Lisa M.

In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 343-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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