Argument quality and group member status as determinants of attitudinal minority influence

Rick Garlick, Paul Mongeau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study examined how individual status characteristics influence minority member persuasiveness. Participants were given photographs of a four‐person group and a transcript of their discussion. One group member was identified as holding a minority opinion. Five variables were orthogonally manipulated: Minority member occupational status, minority member expertise, minority member attractiveness, minority argument quality, and majority argument quality. Results demonstrated that although all variables influenced perceived status, only relative argument quality had a direct impact on attitude change. The findings suggest an interaction of normative and informational influences in determining minority member effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-308
Number of pages20
JournalWestern Journal of Communication
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

group membership
minority
determinants
occupational status
attitude change
Argument Quality
Minorities
social attraction
expertise
interaction
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Cite this

Argument quality and group member status as determinants of attitudinal minority influence. / Garlick, Rick; Mongeau, Paul.

In: Western Journal of Communication, Vol. 57, No. 3, 1993, p. 289-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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