Are Volunteer Satisfaction and Enjoyment Related to Cessation of Volunteering by Older Adults?

Morris Okun, Frank Infurna, Ianeta Hutchinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Previous research indicates that volunteer satisfaction and enjoyment do not exert direct effects on the cessation of volunteering by older adults. This study examined whether satisfaction with and enjoyment of volunteering indirectly affect volunteer cessation via hours volunteered. Method: Our sample consisted of participants in the Americans' Changing Lives study (N = 380) who were 65 years old and older and who volunteered at Wave 1. Volunteer satisfaction, volunteer enjoyment, hours volunteered, and several covariates were assessed at Wave 1, and volunteer cessation was assessed 3 years later at Wave 2. Results: Volunteer satisfaction and volunteer enjoyment were positively associated with hours volunteered, and more hours volunteered was associated with decreased likelihood of volunteer cessation. The indirect effects of volunteer satisfaction and volunteer enjoyment on volunteer cessation via hours volunteered were -.023 (p =. 059) and -.036 (p =. 015), respectively. Discussion: The dynamics of volunteer cessation are important because a volunteer shortage is forecasted and because the benefits of volunteering may attenuate when volunteering stops. Future research should test the proposed causal sequence using longitudinal data with at least 3 waves.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)439-444
Number of pages6
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Keywords

  • Enjoyment
  • Indirect effects
  • Mediation
  • Satisfaction
  • Volunteering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology

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