Are Practitioners Equipped to Work With and Advocate for Members of the American Jewish Community? An Analysis of Discourse-Shaping Periodicals

David R. Hodge, Stephanie C. Boddie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    American Jews represent a culturally distinct community that is increasingly victimized by hate crimes and other antisemitic acts. To determine the degree to which social work practitioners are equipped to work with, and advocate for, members of the American Jewish community, this study analyzed 10 years of content appearing in nine discourse-shaping periodicals. Manual and electronic searches were conducted, with two coders independently reviewing and analyzing the obtained literature in each search arm. The analysis yielded six articles that focused on Jews (four in an Israeli context). No articles featured the voice of American Jews, focused on culturally competent practice with American Jews, or addressed contemporary antisemitism. The results suggest that American Jews are largely invisible in social work discourse, which raises questions about the profession’s ability to comply with its ethical standards.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalFamilies in Society
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2021

    Keywords

    • antisemitism
    • cultural competency
    • discrimination
    • hate crimes
    • Jewish
    • Judaism
    • religion
    • social work values

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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