Are Dimensions of Parenting Differentially Linked to Substance Use Across Caucasian and Asian American College Students?

Jeremy W. Luk, Julie Patock-Peckham, Kevin M. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Parental warmth and autonomy granting are commonly thought of as protective factors against substance use among Caucasians. However, limited research has examined whether associations between parenting dimensions and substance use outcomes are the same or different among Asian Americans. Method: A final analytic sample of 839 college students was used to test whether race (Caucasian vs. Asian American) moderated the relations between parenting dimensions and substance use outcomes across Caucasians and Asian Americans. We utilized the Parental Bonding Instrument (Parker, Tupling, & Brown, 1979) to measure maternal and paternal warmth, encouragement of behavioral freedom, and denial of psychological autonomy. Results: Multivariate regression models controlling for covariates including age, gender, and paternal education indicated four significant parenting by race interactions on alcohol problems and/or marijuana use. Specifically, maternal warmth was inversely associated with both alcohol problems and marijuana use among Caucasians but not among Asian Americans. Both maternal and paternal denial of psychological autonomy were positively associated with alcohol problems among Caucasians but not among Asian Americans. Conclusions: Consistent with emerging cross-cultural research, the associations between parenting dimensions and substance use behaviors observed in Caucasian populations may not be readily generalized to Asian Americans. These findings highlight the importance of considering different parenting dimensions in understanding substance use etiology among Asian Americans. Future research should use longitudinal data to replicate these findings across development and seek to identify other parenting dimensions that may be more relevant for Asian American youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1360-1369
Number of pages10
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume50
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Parenting
Caucasian
Students
student
autonomy
alcohol
Alcohols
Mothers
Cannabis
Paternal Age
Psychology
etiology
Research
regression
gender
interaction
Education
education

Keywords

  • alcohol problems
  • Asian Americans
  • marijuana use
  • parental autonomy granting
  • parental warmth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Are Dimensions of Parenting Differentially Linked to Substance Use Across Caucasian and Asian American College Students? / Luk, Jeremy W.; Patock-Peckham, Julie; King, Kevin M.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 50, No. 10, 01.01.2015, p. 1360-1369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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