Abstract

Recent work on cognitive control focuses on the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, which posits that a performance monitoring mechanism recruits regions in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to ensure that goal-directed behavior is optimal. Critical to this theory is that a single performance monitoring mechanism explains a large number of behavioral effects including the sequential congruency effect (SCE) and the error-related slowing (ERS) effect. This leads to the prediction that the size of these effects should correlate across cognitive control tasks. To this end, we conducted three large-scale individual differences experiments to examine whether the SCE and ERS effect are correlated across Simon, Flanker, and Stroop tasks. Across all experiments, the results revealed a correlation for the error-related slowing effect, but not for the sequential congruency effect across tasks. We discuss the implications of these results in regards to the hypothesis that a domain-general performance monitoring mechanism drives both effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 26 2018

Fingerprint

control process
Prefrontal Cortex
Individuality
performance monitoring
Conflict (Psychology)
Drive
Cognitive Control
experiment
monitoring
Monitoring

Keywords

  • Cognitive control
  • Conflict-monitoring
  • Error-related slowing
  • Individual differences
  • Sequential congruency effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

@article{451bc62634264d3bacea0705029669a0,
title = "Are Cognitive Control Processes Reliable?",
abstract = "Recent work on cognitive control focuses on the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, which posits that a performance monitoring mechanism recruits regions in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to ensure that goal-directed behavior is optimal. Critical to this theory is that a single performance monitoring mechanism explains a large number of behavioral effects including the sequential congruency effect (SCE) and the error-related slowing (ERS) effect. This leads to the prediction that the size of these effects should correlate across cognitive control tasks. To this end, we conducted three large-scale individual differences experiments to examine whether the SCE and ERS effect are correlated across Simon, Flanker, and Stroop tasks. Across all experiments, the results revealed a correlation for the error-related slowing effect, but not for the sequential congruency effect across tasks. We discuss the implications of these results in regards to the hypothesis that a domain-general performance monitoring mechanism drives both effects.",
keywords = "Cognitive control, Conflict-monitoring, Error-related slowing, Individual differences, Sequential congruency effect",
author = "Whitehead, {Peter S.} and Gene Brewer and Christopher Blais",
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journal = "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition",
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AU - Blais, Christopher

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N2 - Recent work on cognitive control focuses on the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, which posits that a performance monitoring mechanism recruits regions in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to ensure that goal-directed behavior is optimal. Critical to this theory is that a single performance monitoring mechanism explains a large number of behavioral effects including the sequential congruency effect (SCE) and the error-related slowing (ERS) effect. This leads to the prediction that the size of these effects should correlate across cognitive control tasks. To this end, we conducted three large-scale individual differences experiments to examine whether the SCE and ERS effect are correlated across Simon, Flanker, and Stroop tasks. Across all experiments, the results revealed a correlation for the error-related slowing effect, but not for the sequential congruency effect across tasks. We discuss the implications of these results in regards to the hypothesis that a domain-general performance monitoring mechanism drives both effects.

AB - Recent work on cognitive control focuses on the conflict-monitoring hypothesis, which posits that a performance monitoring mechanism recruits regions in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to ensure that goal-directed behavior is optimal. Critical to this theory is that a single performance monitoring mechanism explains a large number of behavioral effects including the sequential congruency effect (SCE) and the error-related slowing (ERS) effect. This leads to the prediction that the size of these effects should correlate across cognitive control tasks. To this end, we conducted three large-scale individual differences experiments to examine whether the SCE and ERS effect are correlated across Simon, Flanker, and Stroop tasks. Across all experiments, the results revealed a correlation for the error-related slowing effect, but not for the sequential congruency effect across tasks. We discuss the implications of these results in regards to the hypothesis that a domain-general performance monitoring mechanism drives both effects.

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