Are affluent youth truly "at risk"? Vulnerability and resilience across three diverse samples

Suniya Luthar, Samuel H. Barkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Building upon prior findings of elevated problems among East Coast suburban youth through the 11th grade, this study establishes disproportionately high incidence of maladjustment across three disparate samples: East Coast Suburban youth at the end of their senior year in high school, and 11th and 12th graders in (a) a Northwest suburb and (b) an East Coast city. Both East Coast samples showed pronounced elevations in substance use, whereas the Northwest suburban sample showed marked vulnerability in serious internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Across all samples, parents' low perceived containment for substance use (lax repercussions on discovering use) was a major vulnerability factor, followed by parents' knowledge of their teens' activities. Overall, adolescents' symptom levels were more strongly related to their relationships with mothers than with fathers. An exception was boys' apparent vulnerability to fathers', but not mothers', perceived depressive symptoms. As with affluent eighth graders, we found that "overscheduling" in extracurriculars is not a critical vulnerability factor among these high school students. Finally, youth reports suggested that most affluent parents do not indiscriminately bail their children out of all problem situations (although a small subset, apparently, do). Results are discussed along with the implications for practice and for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-449
Number of pages21
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Parents
Fathers
Mothers
Depression
Students
Incidence
bailing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Are affluent youth truly "at risk"? Vulnerability and resilience across three diverse samples. / Luthar, Suniya; Barkin, Samuel H.

In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 24, No. 2, 05.2012, p. 429-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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