Applying the job demands-resources model to migrant workers: EXPLORING how and when geographical distance increases quit propensity

Xin Qin, Peter Hom, Minya Xu, Dong Ju

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

We extend the job demands-resources model to explain how and when rural migrants who work far from their families and provincial hometowns are more likely to leave jobs. Through two studies, we found that the geographical distance between employees' workplace and home village, representing a proxy for a wide range of migration demands and resources, may engender higher turnover intentions under some conditions. Specifically, employees' psychological contract fulfilment diminished positive associations between geographical distance and turnover intentions. Moreover, we demonstrated emotional exhaustion as an explanatory mechanism underlying the relationship between geographical distance and turnover intentions. Our investigation thus yielded greater insight into rural migrants' quit propensity by identifying geographical distance (a proxy for migration-based demands and resources) as a key driver whose influence is mediated by emotional exhaustion and moderated by psychological contract fulfilment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-328
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Volume87
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Geographical distance
  • Job Demands-Resources model
  • Migrant worker
  • Psychological contract fulfilment
  • Turnover intentions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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