Application of planned behavior theory to predicting volunteer enrollment by college students in a campus-based program

Morris A. Okun, Erin S. Sloane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study tested two hypotheses derived from the theory of planned behavior regarding volunteer enrollment by college students in a campus-based program. Undergraduates (N = 647) enrolled in eight sections of Introduction to Psychology received a recruitment message for volunteering through a campus-based program. Following exposure to the recruitment message, students completed a questionnaire and two months later the enrollment records of the campus-based program were checked. Consistent with the theory of planned behavior, attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control predicted intent - and intent, in turn, predicted volunteer enrollment in the campus-based program. However, less than 33% of the students with the maximum possible intention score of six subsequently enrolled to volunteer in the campus-based program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-249
Number of pages7
JournalSocial Behavior and Personality
Volume30
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Volunteers
Students
Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • College students
  • Intentions
  • Motivation
  • Planned behavior
  • Volunteering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Application of planned behavior theory to predicting volunteer enrollment by college students in a campus-based program. / Okun, Morris A.; Sloane, Erin S.

In: Social Behavior and Personality, Vol. 30, No. 3, 2002, p. 243-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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