Apparent motion between shapes differing in location and orientation: A window technique for estimating path curvature

Michael McBeath, Roger N. Shepard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When a shape is alternately presented in two positions differing in both location and orientation, apparent motion tends to be experienced over a curved path. The curvature provides evidence about principles of object motion that may have been internalized in the perceptual system. This study introduces a technique for estimating deviation from a straight path. A shape was alternately presented on the two sides of a visual partition with a "window" just wide enough to accommodate the shape. Observers adjusted the location of the window to maximize the illusion of smooth passage of the shape through the window. In accordance with theoretical expectations, estimated deviations from rectilinear motion increased with the separation between the stimuli in spatial location, angular orientation, and time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)333-337
Number of pages5
JournalPerception & Psychophysics
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

stimulus
evidence
Curvature
Deviation
time
Stimulus
Observer
Rectilinear
Illusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Apparent motion between shapes differing in location and orientation : A window technique for estimating path curvature. / McBeath, Michael; Shepard, Roger N.

In: Perception & Psychophysics, Vol. 46, No. 4, 07.1989, p. 333-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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