Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals

Daniel J. Diekema, Bonnie J. BootsMiller, Thomas E. Vaughn, Robert F. Woolson, Jon W. Yankey, Erika J. Ernst, Stephen D. Flach, Marcia M. Ward, C. L J Franciscus, Michael A. Pfaller, Bradley Doebbeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

222 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We assessed resistance rates and trends for important antimicrobial- resistant pathogens (oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [ORSA], vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus species [VRE], ceftazidime-resistant Klebsiella species [K-ESBL], and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli [QREC]), the frequency of outbreaks of infection with these resistant pathogens, and the measures taken to control resistance in a stratified national sample of 670 hospitals. Four hundred ninety-four (74%) of 670 surveys were returned. Resistance rates were highest for ORSA (36%), followed by VRE (10%), QREC (6%), and K-ESBL (5%). Two-thirds of hospitals reported increasing ORSA rates, whereas only 4% reported decreasing rates, and 24% reported ORSA outbreaks within the previous year. Most hospitals (87%) reported having implemented measures to rapidly detect resistance, but only ∼50% reported having provided appropriate resources for antimicrobial resistance prevention (53%) or having implemented antimicrobial use guidelines (60%). The most common resistant pathogen in US hospitals is ORSA, which accounts for many recognized outbreaks and is increasing in frequency in most facilities. Current practices to prevent and control antimicrobial resistance are inadequate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-85
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Oxacillin
State Hospitals
Disease Outbreaks
Staphylococcus aureus
Ceftazidime
Klebsiella
Ciprofloxacin
Guidelines
Escherichia coli
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Diekema, D. J., BootsMiller, B. J., Vaughn, T. E., Woolson, R. F., Yankey, J. W., Ernst, E. J., ... Doebbeling, B. (2004). Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 38(1), 78-85. https://doi.org/10.1086/380457

Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals. / Diekema, Daniel J.; BootsMiller, Bonnie J.; Vaughn, Thomas E.; Woolson, Robert F.; Yankey, Jon W.; Ernst, Erika J.; Flach, Stephen D.; Ward, Marcia M.; Franciscus, C. L J; Pfaller, Michael A.; Doebbeling, Bradley.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 78-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diekema, DJ, BootsMiller, BJ, Vaughn, TE, Woolson, RF, Yankey, JW, Ernst, EJ, Flach, SD, Ward, MM, Franciscus, CLJ, Pfaller, MA & Doebbeling, B 2004, 'Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 78-85. https://doi.org/10.1086/380457
Diekema DJ, BootsMiller BJ, Vaughn TE, Woolson RF, Yankey JW, Ernst EJ et al. Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2004 Jan 1;38(1):78-85. https://doi.org/10.1086/380457
Diekema, Daniel J. ; BootsMiller, Bonnie J. ; Vaughn, Thomas E. ; Woolson, Robert F. ; Yankey, Jon W. ; Ernst, Erika J. ; Flach, Stephen D. ; Ward, Marcia M. ; Franciscus, C. L J ; Pfaller, Michael A. ; Doebbeling, Bradley. / Antimicrobial Resistance Trends and Outbreak Frequency in United States Hospitals. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2004 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 78-85.
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