Antecedents of health IT roll back

Kartik K. Ganju, Hilal Atasoy, Paul A. Pavlou, Pei-yu Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The adoption of Health IT has been argued to bring about improvements in adopting hospitals. However, examining a panel of hospitals for the adoption of IT, we find that close to 50% of hospitals that adopt a health IT system go on to stop using it during the duration of our panel.1 We find that smaller hospitals and hospitals that are located in areas that have low IT-Intensity are more likely to roll-back IT systems. Additionally, we find that advanced IT systems (that are more complex to implement) are more likely to be rolled back in the absence of complementary services and in smaller organizations. Additionally, we discuss further research that we hope to undertake where we examine the effect of other factors on the probability of roll-back. We hope that reducing this roll-back can reduce the unnecessary costs that hospitals may have to incur as they implement IT systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication35th International Conference on Information Systems "Building a Better World Through Information Systems", ICIS 2014
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
StatePublished - 2014
Event35th International Conference on Information Systems: Building a Better World Through Information Systems, ICIS 2014 - Auckland, New Zealand
Duration: Dec 14 2014Dec 17 2014

Other

Other35th International Conference on Information Systems: Building a Better World Through Information Systems, ICIS 2014
CountryNew Zealand
CityAuckland
Period12/14/1412/17/14

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Keywords

  • Health IT
  • Hospitals
  • Roll-back of IT systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Ganju, K. K., Atasoy, H., Pavlou, P. A., & Chen, P. (2014). Antecedents of health IT roll back. In 35th International Conference on Information Systems "Building a Better World Through Information Systems", ICIS 2014 Association for Information Systems.

Antecedents of health IT roll back. / Ganju, Kartik K.; Atasoy, Hilal; Pavlou, Paul A.; Chen, Pei-yu.

35th International Conference on Information Systems "Building a Better World Through Information Systems", ICIS 2014. Association for Information Systems, 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ganju, KK, Atasoy, H, Pavlou, PA & Chen, P 2014, Antecedents of health IT roll back. in 35th International Conference on Information Systems "Building a Better World Through Information Systems", ICIS 2014. Association for Information Systems, 35th International Conference on Information Systems: Building a Better World Through Information Systems, ICIS 2014, Auckland, New Zealand, 12/14/14.
Ganju KK, Atasoy H, Pavlou PA, Chen P. Antecedents of health IT roll back. In 35th International Conference on Information Systems "Building a Better World Through Information Systems", ICIS 2014. Association for Information Systems. 2014
Ganju, Kartik K. ; Atasoy, Hilal ; Pavlou, Paul A. ; Chen, Pei-yu. / Antecedents of health IT roll back. 35th International Conference on Information Systems "Building a Better World Through Information Systems", ICIS 2014. Association for Information Systems, 2014.
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