Antecedents and consequences of cross-functional cooperation: A comparison of R&D, manufacturing, and marketing perspectives

X. Michael Song, Mitzi M. Montoya-Weiss, Jeffrey B. Schmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

310 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By breaking down the walls among the R&D, manufacturing, and marketing functions, techniques such as concurrent engineering and quality function deployment can pave the way to more effective new product development (NPD). Recognizing the benefits of such cross-functional efforts, practitioners and researchers have examined the interrelationships among various groups in the NPD process, paying particularly close attention to the R&D-marketing interface. However, manufacturing also plays an important role in NPD. Consequently, any thorough exploration of the relationship between cross-functional cooperation and NPD success must consider manufacturing's perspective. X. Michael Song, Mitzi M. Montoya-Weiss, and Jeffrey B. Schmidt provide such a balanced perspective in a study of cross-functional cooperation during NPD in Mexican high-tech firms. Notwithstanding the differing functional goals, objectives, and reward systems present in R&D, manufacturing and marketing, they hypothesize that all three functions recognize that successful NPD requires cross-functional cooperation. In particular, they expect that representatives of these three functional groups will share similar perceptions, regarding both the drivers and the consequences of cross-functional cooperation. The survey results support the hypothesis that R&D, manufacturing, and marketing professionals share the same perceptions, regarding the drivers and the consequences of cross-functional cooperation. Respondents from all three groups view internal facilitators as the drivers of cross-functional cooperation. In other words, regardless of their functional area, the survey respondents believe that the strongest, most direct effects on cross-functional cooperation and NPD performance come from a firm's evaluation criteria, reward structures, and management expectations. Respondents perceive these internal facilitators as having a greater effect on cross-functional cooperation than that of external forces such as market competitiveness and technological change. In fact, contrary to expectations, the respondents do not view these external forces as having a significant effect on cross-functional cooperation or NPD performance. And contrary to persistent reports about friction between technical and nontechnical personnel, all three groups perceive a strong, positive relationship between cross-functional communication and NPD performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-47
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Product Innovation Management
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Product development
Marketing
Quality function deployment
Manufacturing
Concurrent engineering
New product development
Functional groups
Personnel
Friction
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

Cite this

Antecedents and consequences of cross-functional cooperation : A comparison of R&D, manufacturing, and marketing perspectives. / Song, X. Michael; Montoya-Weiss, Mitzi M.; Schmidt, Jeffrey B.

In: Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.1997, p. 35-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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