Angels and Demons: Using behavioral types in a real-effort moral dilemma to identify expert traits

Hernán D. Bejarano, Ellen Green, Stephen J. Rassenti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, we explore how independently reported measures of subjects' cognitive capabilities, preferences, and sociodemographic characteristics relate to their behavior in a real-effort moral dilemma experiment. To do this, we use a unique dataset, the Chapman Preferences and Characteristics Instrument Set (CPCIS), which contains over 30 standardized measures of preferences and characteristics. We find that simple correlation analysis provides an incomplete picture of how individual measures relate to behavior. In contrast, clustering subjects into groups based on observed behavior in the real-effort task reveals important systematic differences in individual characteristics across groups. However, while we find more differences, these differences are not systematic and difficult to interpret. These results indicate a need for more comprehensive theory explaining how combinations of different individual characteristics impact behavior is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1464
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume7
Issue numberOCT
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 25 2016

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Individuality
Cluster Analysis
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Keywords

  • Abstract effort
  • Cognitive capabilities
  • Experiment
  • Moral dilemma
  • Personality
  • Preferences
  • Real effort
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Angels and Demons : Using behavioral types in a real-effort moral dilemma to identify expert traits. / Bejarano, Hernán D.; Green, Ellen; Rassenti, Stephen J.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 7, No. OCT, 1464, 25.10.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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