Ancestry, Plasmodium cynomolgi prevalence and rhesus macaque admixture in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) bred for export in Chinese breeding farms

Xinjun Zhang, Yuhuan Meng, Paul Houghton, Mingyu Liu, Sreetharan Kanthaswamy, Robert Oldt, Jillian Ng, Jessica Satkoski Trask, Ren Huang, Balbir Singh, Hongli Du, David Glenn Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Most cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used in the United States as animal models are imported from Chinese breeding farms without documented ancestry. Cynomolgus macaques with varying rhesus macaque ancestry proportions may exhibit differences, such as susceptibility to malaria, that affect their suitability as a research model. Methods: DNA of 400 cynomolgus macaques from 10 Chinese breeding farms was genotyped to characterize their regional origin and rhesus ancestry proportion. A nested PCR assay was used to detect Plasmodium cynomolgi infection in sampled individuals. Results: All populations exhibited high levels of genetic heterogeneity and low levels of inbreeding and genetic subdivision. Almost all individuals exhibited an Indochinese origin and a rhesus ancestry proportion of 5%-48%. The incidence of P. cynomolgi infection in cynomolgus macaques is strongly associated with proportion of rhesus ancestry. Conclusions: The varying amount of rhesus ancestry in cynomolgus macaques underscores the importance of monitoring their genetic similarity in malaria research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-41
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Medical Primatology
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Macaca fascicularis
  • Macaca mulatta
  • Plasmodium cynomolgi
  • admixture
  • ancestry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

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