An ontology-based collaborative service-oriented simulation framework with Microsoft Robotics Studio®

W. T. Tsai, Xin Sun, Qian Huang, Helen Karatza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), the concepts that services can be discovered and application can be composed via service discovery bring great flexibility to application development [Y. Chen, W.T. Tsai, Distributed Service-Oriented Software Development, Kendall/Hunt, 2008, [4]]. Microsoft Robotics Studio (MSRS) is a recent initiative in applying SOA to embedded systems and one of its key features is its 3-D simulation tool that allows applications to be simulated before deployment. This paper proposes an ontology-based service-oriented simulation framework with MSRS by adding a set of ontology systems, i.e., service ontology, workflow ontology, entity ontology, and environment ontology. These ontology systems store relevant information useful to compose simulation applications, and items stored also cross reference to each other to facilitate reusability and rapid application composition, This paper then provides a detailed case study on a popular robotic game Sumobot using MSRS to illustrate the key concepts and how they can support rapid simulation development.1The contents of this paper were developed under a grant from US Department of Defense and the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), US Department of Education. However, these contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1392-1414
Number of pages23
JournalSimulation Modelling Practice and Theory
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Fingerprint

Simulation Framework
Studios
Service-oriented
Ontology
Robotics
Education
Service-oriented Architecture
Service oriented architecture (SOA)
Computer systems
Service Discovery
Reusability
Simulation Tool
Embedded systems
Embedded Systems
Software Development
Work Flow
3D
Software engineering
Simulation
Flexibility

Keywords

  • Model-driven development
  • Ontology
  • Robotics Studio
  • Service-oriented computing
  • Simulation framework

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Software
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

An ontology-based collaborative service-oriented simulation framework with Microsoft Robotics Studio® . / Tsai, W. T.; Sun, Xin; Huang, Qian; Karatza, Helen.

In: Simulation Modelling Practice and Theory, Vol. 16, No. 9, 10.2008, p. 1392-1414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tsai, W. T. ; Sun, Xin ; Huang, Qian ; Karatza, Helen. / An ontology-based collaborative service-oriented simulation framework with Microsoft Robotics Studio® In: Simulation Modelling Practice and Theory. 2008 ; Vol. 16, No. 9. pp. 1392-1414.
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