An in vitro selection protocol for threose nucleic acid (TNA) using DNA display

Matthew R. Dunn, John C. Chaput

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Threose nucleic acid (TNA) is an unnatural genetic polymer composed of repeating threofuranosyl sugars linked by 2' and 3' phosphodiester bonds. TNA is capable of forming antiparallel Watson-Crick duplex structures in a self-pairing mode, and can also cross-pair opposite complementary strands of DNA and RNA. The solution NMR structure of a self-complementary TNA duplex reveals that TNA adopts an A-form helical structure, which explains its ability to exchange genetic information with natural genetic polymers. In a recent advance, a TNA aptamer was evolved from a pool of random sequences using an engineered polymerase that can copy DNA sequences into TNA. This unit details the steps required to evolve functional TNA molecules in the laboratory using a method called DNA display. Using this approach, TNA molecules are physically linked to their encoding double-stranded DNA template. By linking TNA phenotype with DNA genotype, one can select for TNA molecules with a desired function and recover their encoding genetic information by PCR amplification. Each round of selection requires ~3 days to complete and multiple rounds of selection and amplification are required to generate functional TNA molecules.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9.8.1-9.8.19
JournalCurrent Protocols in Nucleic Acid Chemistry
Volume2014
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Aptamer
  • DNA display
  • In vitro selection
  • Oligonucleotide
  • Threose nucleic acid (TNA)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

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