An eye tracking study of minimally branded products: hedonism and branding as predictors of purchase intentions

Juan Mundel, Patricia Huddleston, Bridget Behe, Lynnell Sage, Caroline Latona

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study aims to test the relationship between consumers’ perceptions of product type (utilitarian vs hedonic) and the attentional processes that underlie decision-making among minimally branded products. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses eye-tracking measures (i.e. total fixation duration) and data collected through an online survey. Findings: The study shows that consumers spend more time looking at hedonic (vs utilitarian) and branded (vs unbranded) products, which influences perceptions of quality. Practical implications: The findings of this research provide guidelines for marketing minimally branded products. Originality/value: The authors showed that the product type influences the time consumers spend looking at an item. Previous findings about effects of branding are extended to an understudied product category (i.e. live potted plants).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-157
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Product and Brand Management
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Branding
  • Experimental Design
  • Eye-tracking
  • Hedonic and utilitarian consumption
  • Retailing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An eye tracking study of minimally branded products: hedonism and branding as predictors of purchase intentions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this