An experimental evaluation of theory-based mother and mother-child programs for children of divorce

Sharlene Wolchik, Stephen West, Irwin Sandler, Jenn-Yun Tein, Douglas Coatsworth, Liliana Lengua, Lillie Weiss, Edward R. Anderson, Shannon M. Greene, William Griffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 theory-based preventive interventions for divorced families: a program for mothers and a dual component mother-child program. The mother program targeted mother-child relationship quality, discipline, interparental conflict, and the father-child relationship. The child program targeted active coping, avoidant coping, appraisals of divorce stressors, and mother-child relationship quality. Families with a 9- to 12-year-old child (N = 240) were randomly assigned to the mother, dual-component, or self-study program. Postintervention comparisons showed significant positive program effects of the mother program versus self-study condition on relationship quality, discipline, attitude toward father-child contact, and adjustment problems. For several outcomes, more positive effects occurred in families with poorer initial functioning. Program effects on externalizing problems were maintained at 6-month follow-up. A few additive effects of the dual-component program occurred for the putative mediators; none occurred for adjustment problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)843-856
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume68
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Divorce
Mothers
Social Adjustment
Mother-Child Relations
Father-Child Relations
Family Conflict
Fathers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

An experimental evaluation of theory-based mother and mother-child programs for children of divorce. / Wolchik, Sharlene; West, Stephen; Sandler, Irwin; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Coatsworth, Douglas; Lengua, Liliana; Weiss, Lillie; Anderson, Edward R.; Greene, Shannon M.; Griffin, William.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 68, No. 5, 2000, p. 843-856.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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