An examination of the influence of perceived parenting practices on depression and substance use among African American juvenile offenders

Roslyn M. Caldwell, Susan M. Sturgess, N. Clayton Silver, Jesse Brinson, Ramona Denby-Brinson, Kirby Burgess

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to examine whether perceived parenting practices were related to and predictive of depression and substance use among 119 African American juvenile offenders. Findings revealed that maternal practices were related to and predictive of depression, with maternal roles accounting for most of the variance. Paternal practices were related to and predictive of substance use with paternal roles and affective involvement accounting for most of the variance. Taken together, the results reinforce previous research in the general adolescent population by highlighting the role of the parent- adolescent relationship in an adolescents' involvement in maladaptive and/or delinquent behaviors. This study discusses the significance of understanding the link between parenting practices, depression, and substance use among African American juvenile offenders, as well as implications for forensic psychology practice and directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-50
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Forensic Psychology Practice
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2006

Keywords

  • African American juvenile offenders
  • Depression
  • Parenting practices
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Applied Psychology

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