An event-driven lens for bridging formal organizations and informal online participation

How policy informatics enables just-in-time responses to crises

Chul Hyun Park, Erik Johnston

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Policy informatics not only gives new approaches to analyzing policy challenges, but also provides guidance for understanding new forms of organizing in the digital era. This chapter aims to investigate how technology accelerates the creation of just-in-time efforts while also lowering the barriers for joining such efforts to an increasingly diverse set of formal and informal actors who can make a meaningful contribution in the context of emergency management. In this chapter, we suggest a novel and extended lens called an ‘event-driven’ lens for integrating formal and informal responses by reviewing the literature on emergency management, crowdsourcing, open innovation, policy informatics, and digital humanitarianism. The novel lens is called an event-driven lens because crises serve as a focusing event that suddenly bring about not only the activation of formal organizations and their latent networks across the levels of government and the sectors, but also the emergence of many informal actors across the globe and from the affected communities to collectively respond to disasters or crises. Traditionally, emergency preparedness and response are in large part the role and responsibility of formal organizations like emergency management agencies and police and fire departments. Due to concurrent advances in a variety of technologies (information, communication, and artificial intelligence), informal groups of publics from both across the globe and the affected regions now regularly emerge and can play a significant role in the response through crowdsourcing vital information and assisting with the allocation of needed resources and services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPublic Administration and Information Technology
PublisherSpringer
Pages343-361
Number of pages19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NamePublic Administration and Information Technology
Volume25
ISSN (Print)2512-1812
ISSN (Electronic)2512-1839

Fingerprint

Lenses
participation
event
fire department
management
informal group
humanitarianism
innovation policy
artificial intelligence
activation
disaster
Law enforcement
police
information technology
Joining
Disasters
Artificial intelligence
Information technology
responsibility
Fires

Keywords

  • Computational technology
  • Crisis informatics
  • Crowdsourcing
  • Digital humanitarianism
  • Emergency management
  • Information and communication technology
  • Policy informatics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration
  • Information Systems and Management
  • Management Information Systems
  • Information Systems

Cite this

Park, C. H., & Johnston, E. (2018). An event-driven lens for bridging formal organizations and informal online participation: How policy informatics enables just-in-time responses to crises. In Public Administration and Information Technology (pp. 343-361). (Public Administration and Information Technology; Vol. 25). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61762-6_15

An event-driven lens for bridging formal organizations and informal online participation : How policy informatics enables just-in-time responses to crises. / Park, Chul Hyun; Johnston, Erik.

Public Administration and Information Technology. Springer, 2018. p. 343-361 (Public Administration and Information Technology; Vol. 25).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Park, CH & Johnston, E 2018, An event-driven lens for bridging formal organizations and informal online participation: How policy informatics enables just-in-time responses to crises. in Public Administration and Information Technology. Public Administration and Information Technology, vol. 25, Springer, pp. 343-361. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61762-6_15
Park CH, Johnston E. An event-driven lens for bridging formal organizations and informal online participation: How policy informatics enables just-in-time responses to crises. In Public Administration and Information Technology. Springer. 2018. p. 343-361. (Public Administration and Information Technology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61762-6_15
Park, Chul Hyun ; Johnston, Erik. / An event-driven lens for bridging formal organizations and informal online participation : How policy informatics enables just-in-time responses to crises. Public Administration and Information Technology. Springer, 2018. pp. 343-361 (Public Administration and Information Technology).
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