An escherichia coli concentrator using magnetic particles in a microfluidic channel for the urinary tract infection (UTI) application

Yongmo Yang, Sangpyeong Kim, Junseok Chae

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper reports a miniaturized lab-on-a-chip device to detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) from simulated urine using magnetic particles (MPs) in a microfluidic channel. The lab-on-a-chip device consists of two chambers connected in series, E. coli concentration and sensing chamber, integrated with a label free impedance sensor to detect the concentration of E. coli for urinary tract infection (UTI) application. The two chamber configuration is designed to reduce potential false-positive response caused by proteins in urine. The integrated impedance sensor in the concentration chamber shows little impedance change in different E. coli concentrations due to masking effect by proteins while the one in the sensing chamber shows a significant (30 kΩ) change between control (no E. coli) and a concentration of 6.4x10 4 CFU/mL, close to the threshold of UTI infection, which is above 10 5 CFU/mL. This demonstrates the effectiveness of the dual-chamber design to detect E. coli for the UTI application.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop
EditorsDavid J. Monk, Kimberly L. Turner
PublisherTransducer Research Foundation
Pages162-165
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9780964002494
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Event2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop - Hilton Head Island, United States
Duration: Jun 6 2010Jun 10 2010

Publication series

NameTechnical Digest - Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop

Conference

Conference2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop
CountryUnited States
CityHilton Head Island
Period6/6/106/10/10

Fingerprint

Microfluidics
Escherichia coli
Lab-on-a-chip
Proteins
Sensors
Labels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

Yang, Y., Kim, S., & Chae, J. (2010). An escherichia coli concentrator using magnetic particles in a microfluidic channel for the urinary tract infection (UTI) application. In D. J. Monk, & K. L. Turner (Eds.), 2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop (pp. 162-165). (Technical Digest - Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop). Transducer Research Foundation.

An escherichia coli concentrator using magnetic particles in a microfluidic channel for the urinary tract infection (UTI) application. / Yang, Yongmo; Kim, Sangpyeong; Chae, Junseok.

2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop. ed. / David J. Monk; Kimberly L. Turner. Transducer Research Foundation, 2010. p. 162-165 (Technical Digest - Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yang, Y, Kim, S & Chae, J 2010, An escherichia coli concentrator using magnetic particles in a microfluidic channel for the urinary tract infection (UTI) application. in DJ Monk & KL Turner (eds), 2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop. Technical Digest - Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop, Transducer Research Foundation, pp. 162-165, 2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop, Hilton Head Island, United States, 6/6/10.
Yang Y, Kim S, Chae J. An escherichia coli concentrator using magnetic particles in a microfluidic channel for the urinary tract infection (UTI) application. In Monk DJ, Turner KL, editors, 2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop. Transducer Research Foundation. 2010. p. 162-165. (Technical Digest - Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop).
Yang, Yongmo ; Kim, Sangpyeong ; Chae, Junseok. / An escherichia coli concentrator using magnetic particles in a microfluidic channel for the urinary tract infection (UTI) application. 2010 Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop. editor / David J. Monk ; Kimberly L. Turner. Transducer Research Foundation, 2010. pp. 162-165 (Technical Digest - Solid-State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems Workshop).
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