An empirical analysis of the propensity of academics to engage in informal university technology transfer

Albert N. Link, Donald Siegel, Barry Bozeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

272 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Formal university technology transfer mechanisms, through licensing agreements, research joint ventures, and university-based startups, have attracted considerable attention in the academic literature. Surprisingly, there has been little systematic empirical analysis of the propensity of academics to engage in informal technology transfer. This paper presents empirical evidence on the determinants of three types of informal technology transfer by faculty members: transfer of commercial technology, joint publications with industry scientists, and industrial consulting. We find that male, tenured and research-grant active faculty members are more likely to engage in all three forms of informal technology transfer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)641-655
Number of pages15
JournalIndustrial and Corporate Change
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Technology transfer
Empirical analysis
University technology transfer
Propensity
Research joint ventures
Consulting
Start-ups
Licensing
Industry
Empirical evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

An empirical analysis of the propensity of academics to engage in informal university technology transfer. / Link, Albert N.; Siegel, Donald; Bozeman, Barry.

In: Industrial and Corporate Change, Vol. 16, No. 4, 08.2007, p. 641-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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