An assessment and explanation of environmental inequity in Baltimore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Baltimore, census tracts made up of White, working-class people are more likely to contain a Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) facility than primarily Black census tracts. Differences in race characteristics decrease with larger units of analysis and with the use of half-mile buffers around TRI sites. At the census-tract level, race is the most significant population characteristic, followed by income and education. A long history of residential and occupational segregation may explain the proximity of toxic-release sites to working-class White neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-595
Number of pages15
JournalUrban Geography
Volume23
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

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census
working class
population characteristics
segregation
income
education
history
analysis

Keywords

  • Baltimore
  • Environmental equity
  • Segregation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

An assessment and explanation of environmental inequity in Baltimore. / Boone, Christopher.

In: Urban Geography, Vol. 23, No. 6, 2003, p. 581-595.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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