An analysis of employment patterns of domestic migrants and immigrants in a Rustbelt city: A study of Buffalo-Niagara Falls

Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen, Torsten Schunder, Xiaonan Tai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study evaluates employment patterns of domestic migrants and immigrants and also explores the role of ethnic niching for Asian and African American recent arrivals in the context of local structural transformation (e.g., the shift from manufacturing to services). Employment patterns are examined for industry-occupation groups using the 5% Public Use Micro Sample of the 2000 U.S. Decennial Census and the 2006–2010 of the American Community Survey. The study area is a Rustbelt city that has suffered from population loss: the Buffalo-Niagara Falls MSA. Location quotients and shift-share analysis are used to classify employment shifts into four industry-occupation groups: growing, transforming, declining, and emerging. Logistic regressions are estimated to identify the role of various demographic factors and ethnic niches on the employment of recent arrivals in the above four industry-occupation groups. The results show that the employment of recent arrivals vary by migration status and ethnicity. The role of ethnic niches is especially important in declining industry-occupation groups. The analytical framework can be used to understand where and how migrants, both domestic and immigrants, find work. Future studies can focus on the pros and cons of ethnic niching (e.g., barriers to suitable jobs, ethnic entrepreneurship through niche experience) as structural transformation continues across U.S. regions, especially with new technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-143
Number of pages21
JournalGrowth and Change
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change

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