An Adaptive Approach to Family Intervention

Linking Engagement in Family-Centered Intervention to Reductions in Adolescent Problem Behavior

Arin M. Connell, Thomas J. Dishion, Miwa Yasui, Kathryn Kavanagh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

165 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study used Complier Average Causal Effect analysis (CACE; see G. Imbens & D. Rubin, 1997) to examine the impact of an adaptive approach to family intervention in the public schools on rates of substance use and antisocial behavior among students ages 11-17. Students were randomly assigned to a family-centered intervention (N = 998) in 6th grade and offered a multilevel intervention that included (a) a universal classroom-based intervention, (b) the Family Check-Up (selected; T. J. Dishion & K. Kavanagh, 2003), and (c) family management treatment (indicated). All services were voluntary, and approximately 25% of the families engaged in the selected and indicated levels. Participation in the Family Check-Up was predicted by 6th-grade teacher ratings of risk, youth reports of family conflict, and the absence of biological fathers from the youths' primary home. Relative to randomized matched controls, adolescents whose parents engaged in the Family Check-Up exhibited less growth in alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use and problem behavior during ages 11 through 17, along with decreased risk for substance use diagnoses and police records of arrests by age 18.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-579
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Adolescent Behavior
Students
Family Conflict
Tobacco Use
Police
Cannabis
Problem Behavior
Fathers
Parents
Alcohols
Growth

Keywords

  • compliance
  • conduct problems
  • early adolescence
  • family intervention
  • substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

An Adaptive Approach to Family Intervention : Linking Engagement in Family-Centered Intervention to Reductions in Adolescent Problem Behavior. / Connell, Arin M.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Yasui, Miwa; Kavanagh, Kathryn.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 75, No. 4, 08.2007, p. 568-579.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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