An adaptive approach to family-centered intervention in schools: Linking intervention engagement to academic outcomes in middle and high school

Elizabeth A. Stormshak, Arin Connell, Thomas J. Dishion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the impact of an adaptive approach to family intervention in public schools on academic outcomes from age 11 to 17. Students were randomly assigned to the three-session Family Check-Up (FCU), which is designed to motivate change in parenting practices by using an assessment-driven approach and strengths-based feedback. All services were voluntary, and approximately 25% of the families engaged in the FCU. Compared with matched controls, adolescents whose parents received the FCU maintained a satisfactory GPA into high school, and intervention engagement was associated with improved attendance. The highest-risk families were the most likely to engage in the family-centered intervention, suggesting the efficacy of integrating supportive services to families in the context of other schoolwide approaches to promote the success and achievement of vulnerable students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-235
Number of pages15
JournalPrevention Science
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Dosage
  • Early adolescence
  • Family intervention
  • GPA
  • School absence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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