Amorphous water

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

226 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After providing some background material to establish the interest content of this subject, we summarize the many different ways in which water can be prepared in the amorphous state, making clear that there seems to be more than one distinct amorphous state to be considered. We then give some space to structural and spectroscopic characterization of the distinct states, recognizing that whereas there seems to be unambiguously two distinct states, there may be in fact be more, the additional states mimicking the structures of the higher-density crystalline polymorphs. The low-frequency vibrational properties of the amorphous solid states are then examined in some detail because of the gathering evidence that glassy water, while difficult to form directly from the liquid like other glasses, may have some unusual and almost ideal glassy features, manifested by unusually low states of disorder. This notion is pursued in the following section dealing with thermodynamic and relaxational properties, where the uniquely low excess entropy of the vitreous state of water is confirmed by three different estimates. The fact that the most nearly ideal glass known has no properly established glass transition temperature is highlighted, using known dielectric loss data for amorphous solid water (ASW) and relevant molecular glasses. Finally, the polyamorphism of glassy water, and the kinetic aspects of transformation from one form to the other, are reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-583
Number of pages25
JournalAnnual Review of Physical Chemistry
Volume55
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Water
water
Glass
glass
Vibrational spectra
Dielectric losses
Crystallization
dielectric loss
glass transition temperature
Entropy
thermodynamic properties
Thermodynamics
disorders
entropy
low frequencies
solid state
Kinetics
kinetics
Liquids
estimates

Keywords

  • Boson peak
  • Cryoelectron microscopy
  • Glass transition
  • HDA
  • Hyperquench
  • Ideal glass
  • LDA
  • Polyamorphism
  • VHDA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Amorphous water. / Angell, Charles.

In: Annual Review of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 55, 2004, p. 559-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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