American Indian/Alaskan native undergraduate retention at predominantly white institutions: An elaboration of Tinto's theory of college student departure

Junghee Lee, William Donlan, Eddie F. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article reports findings from a major public university sponsored study undertaken with the intention of (a) improving university understanding of factors affecting American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) undergraduates' persistence at this institution, and (b) identifying in what areas, and in what manner, this institution could improve campus-based services to better support AI/AN undergraduates. Tinto's integration-commitment model of attrition was utilized as a conceptual frame, and data was collected using four different methodologies. This study found that financial difficulties and family obligations, and how these two themes interact in the context of AI/AN cultural self-identity are critical issues affecting AI/AN undergraduate persistence. Findings are used to elaborate and more fully develop Tinto's model in its application to AI/AN undergraduate persistence in predominantly White institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-276
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'American Indian/Alaskan native undergraduate retention at predominantly white institutions: An elaboration of Tinto's theory of college student departure'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this