Along the way to developing a theory of the program

A re-examination of the conceptual framework as an organizing strategy

Deborah Helitzer, Andrew L. Sussman, Richard M. Hoffman, Christina M. Getrich, Teddy D. Warner, Robert L. Rhyne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Conceptual frameworks (CF) have historically been used to develop program theory. We re-examine the literature about the role of CF in this context, specifically how they can be used to create descriptive and prescriptive theories, as building blocks for a program theory. Using a case example of colorectal cancer screening intervention development, we describe the process of developing our initial CF, the methods used to explore the constructs in the framework and revise the framework for intervention development. Methods: We present seven steps that guided the development of our CF: (1) assemble the "right" research team, (2) incorporate existing literature into the emerging CF, (3) construct the conceptual framework, (4) diagram the framework, (5) operationalize the framework: develop the research design and measures, (6) conduct the research, and (7) revise the framework. Results: A revised conceptual framework depicted more complicated inter-relationships of the different predisposing, enabling, reinforcing, and system-based factors. The updated framework led us to generate program theory and serves as the basis for designing future intervention studies and outcome evaluations. Conclusions: A CF can build a foundation for program theory. We provide a set of concrete steps and lessons learned to assist practitioners in developing a CF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-163
Number of pages7
JournalEvaluation and Program Planning
Volume45
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

conceptual framework
examination
Early Detection of Cancer
Research
Colorectal Neoplasms
Research Design
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
research planning
cancer
programme
Organizing
Conceptual framework
evaluation
diagram
Program theory
literature

Keywords

  • Conceptual framework
  • Evaluation research
  • Formative research
  • Intervention design
  • Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Social Psychology
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Strategy and Management
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Along the way to developing a theory of the program : A re-examination of the conceptual framework as an organizing strategy. / Helitzer, Deborah; Sussman, Andrew L.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Getrich, Christina M.; Warner, Teddy D.; Rhyne, Robert L.

In: Evaluation and Program Planning, Vol. 45, 01.01.2014, p. 157-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Helitzer, Deborah ; Sussman, Andrew L. ; Hoffman, Richard M. ; Getrich, Christina M. ; Warner, Teddy D. ; Rhyne, Robert L. / Along the way to developing a theory of the program : A re-examination of the conceptual framework as an organizing strategy. In: Evaluation and Program Planning. 2014 ; Vol. 45. pp. 157-163.
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