Alcohol use and serial monogamy as risks for sexually transmitted diseases in young adults

William R. Corbin, Kim Fromme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Alcohol and condom use were assessed using global, situational, and event-level analyses in a sample of young adults (N = 305). Results varied by methodology, event, and partner type; an inverse association between alcohol and condom use was found only at the event level. Participants with strong sex-related expectancies used condoms less frequently when drinking at the time of 1st intercourse with their current partner. For most recent event with a regular partner, alcohol use was unrelated to condom use, but gender, relationship duration, and oral contraceptive use accounted for more than 25% of the variance. Thus, alcohol may increase risky sex early in a relationship, whereas partner familiarity and alternate contraceptive use play a larger role as relationships develop.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-236
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 6 2002
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alcohol expectancy
  • Condom use
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Inhibition conflict
  • Serial monogamy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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