Agreement between the IPAQ and accelerometer for detecting intervention-related changes in physical activity in a sample of latina women

Virginie Nicaise, Noe C. Crespo, Simon Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Even when objective physical activity (PA) measures are preferred, many intervention studies with Latina women rely on self-reports because they are more feasible and the type and domain of PA is of interest. Purpose: This study examined the sensitivity and specificity of the IPAQ for detecting intervention-related changes in physical activity compared with accelerometer measurement among Latinas. Methods: In March 2007, a community sample of 94 women (mean age = 36.31 ± 9.1 yr; mean body mass index = 31.37 ± 7.13) participated in a 12-week pedometer-based intervention to increase moderate intensity physical activity (MPA). Participants completed the Spanish-language International Physical Activity Questionnaire (Sp-IPAQ; telephone, long form) and wore an Actigraph accelerometer for 7 days at baseline and postintervention. Results: Both the IPAQ and the ActiGraph accelerometer detected intervention-related increases in MPA; however, these changes were largely uncorrelated. The IPAQ did not have acceptable level of sensitivity and specificity before and after the intervention when compared with objective assessments. Conclusions: Data suggest that it is important to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the IPAQ with Spanish-speaking participants and further research is needed to accurately measure intervention effectiveness using self-reports of PA in Latinas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)846-852
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Exercise
Sensitivity and Specificity
Self Report
Telephone
Body Mass Index
Language
Research

Keywords

  • Intervention
  • Minorities
  • Self-report data
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Agreement between the IPAQ and accelerometer for detecting intervention-related changes in physical activity in a sample of latina women. / Nicaise, Virginie; Crespo, Noe C.; Marshall, Simon.

In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, Vol. 11, No. 4, 2014, p. 846-852.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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