Abstract

Decommissioning was thought to be an issue of the future, because the large plants, built in the 1960s and 1970s, were assumed to have an expected operating life of 30 to 40 years. This article examines decommissioning of nuclear power plants from a public policy - rather than a technical - perspective. Questions concerning the policy implications associated with decommissioning are asked. - from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)742-755
Number of pages14
JournalPolicy Studies Review
Volume5
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1986

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nuclear power plant
decommissioning
public policy
station
policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Agenda setting and 'non-decisionmaking' : decommissioning nuclear generating stations. / McClain, P. D.; Pijawka, David.

In: Policy Studies Review, Vol. 5, No. 4, 1986, p. 742-755.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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